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20121101
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cuomo and governor bloomberg. and there are two closed door meetings on the deadly attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. one is taking place with the house intelligence committee and the the other with the house foreign affairs committee. there are new developments on the david petraeus front. testimony from members of congress will be happening. the general is set to brief the house intelligence committee tomorrow and likely the senate intelligence committee as well. now the defense secretary leon panetta came out ordering an investigation of legal and ethical issues among military leaders. the president giving his first remarks yesterday on the scandal that prompted the president to resign. >> we're safer because of the work that dpaifd petraeus has done, and my main hope right now is that he and his family are able to move on. and that this ends up being a single side note on what has otherwise been an extraordinary career. >> the president also took leading republicans to task for attacks on the ambassador susan rice and comments she made just days after the deaths of four am
, this was an all-important test of u.s.-egyptians relations following the arab spring. what's the grade? >> well, the grade is good. better than good. you have to be cautious, of course. you're talking about the middle east. but i think that it's remarkable, alex, really, to see the kind of praise that president morsi is receiving. even in those defiant speeches that ayman was referring to, hamas leaders, islamic jihad leaders, benjamin netanyahu's comments last night, secretary clinton's comments last night, president obama's praise, everybody has good things to say about morsi, who has now emerged not only as a can-do politician, but a power broker in the region. for instance, when the truce deal needed to be closed and clinton came to cairo, she spent hours with morsi and with his foreign minister, mohammed kamul, finding the compromise that israel and hamas could live with. mainly stop the hostilities today and negotiate the other demands later. alex? >> jim, thank you very much for that live report from cairo with the latest on the brokering of the truce. joining me now, former u.s. ambassa
, we're talking about what the u.s. gives, $2 billion annually, the imf has $4.8 billion in the reserve fund to help egypt and senator lindsey graham over the weekend was very forceful saying we are watching you. they know full well that aid will be cut off if they don't act accordingly trying to broker a peace deal, correct? >> i would say it's more than just trying to broker a peace deal. i think it's fulfilling its obligations. in the first sense its international obligations. one thing the president morsi understood is if hamas continued to do what it was doing and if the pressures on him led to him breaking the peace treaty with israel, then it wasn't just american assistance that would be put at risk. it would be all the assistance internationally. all the investment egypt would need. so he's putting egypt's needs first and foremost and that suggests that actually the economic imperfect it tiff is trumping the ideological imperatives and that's actually a positive sign for the future. >> with hillary clinton going to the region and with these positive signs that morsi has already
. of course, hamas is classified technically with the u.s. government as a terrorist organization, there are no formal ties, trying to engage hamas to stop this rocket attack to come to some sort of solution so cooler heads can prevail, mara. >> one of the things in terms of the political issue here, the president in the past has been criticized for not being strong enough in his support of israel. do you get the response in washington that his response now is significant in satisfying people who would like for him to express stronger support for israel? >> you know, there has been some controversy, some tension, frankly, between prime minister netanyahu and the president. that's no secret. there was the recent episode where the prime minister went before the united nations andrew that red line, you remember, across that little cartoon bomb. some disagreement about when and where that red line should be drawn with respect to iran's nuclear program. but look, there is no question that any american president, any american government is going to back up israel if it comes to any kind
of israel. the united states gives $3 billion a year in u.s. taxpayer money to israel in addition to weapons, in addition to political support. if we're going to be serious about moving forward, the role has to come from the united states, pressure from the united states. it's not enough to demand that it come from egypt. >> diana buttu, many thanks for your time. we appreciate it. >> my pleasure. >>> back in the u.s., get ou of the way because black friday is here. people spend long hours in line to score major deals this morning. >> it's affordable right now even if you have to be out here for two days to get it. >> it saves a lot of money like a few hundred dollars. >> cnbc's courtney reagan is in dayton, ohio. how is it going so far out there? >> reporter: you know, so far it looks pretty good out here, alex. this mall in particular about did open at midnight. they saw a lot of traffic in the beginning. a lull after the people got what they wanted with the door busters. it's really picking up again here right now and you would never know that it's so early in the morning. it feels like t
for a global perspective is former united states senator george mitchell who served as the u.s. special envoy for middle east peace from 2009 to 2011. sir, welcome. we are awfully glad to have you here. let's talk about egyptian president mohammed morsi who played the critical role. he is facing protests in his own country because he's trying to expand and have further reaching powers. do you see this as a power grab? that he's riding on something of a success? >> churchill once said democracy is the worst possible form of government except for anything else that's been tried by human beings. as senate majority leader, faced with constant delay, frustration, filibustering, i often thought, boy, i would like to be king for a day and cut through all of this. democracy is tough. it's messy and morsi is finding that out. i don't think that what he did was right, and i don't think it will hold. >> with regard to what he's doing now by ordering some retrials in terms of hosni mubarak and his cabinet, what might that do to the situation there? do you worry that would have inflaming factions there? >
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)

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